thigein & conatus

part one of a four-part project. Minus Theatre workshops begin May 5 2016 at Auckland University of Technology

and we will begin work towards a piece called “at the stock market meeting” – a tragedy!

I would like to complete 4 public pieces this year. They already have names!

And early 2017 join them together in an epic work!

By May 5 I am hoping we can bring into the group some new people & maybe bring back

some of those we miss!

Please put out word that this is what we are doing to all your contacts.

And contact me any time if you or others

want to talk about plans for the next projected public works

of Minus Theatre

best

s

simon@minustheatre.com

(&&&[Deleuze])=-1...
...
advertisement
Ἀκαδήμεια
detraque
imarginaleiro
inanimadvertisement
τραῦμα
luz es tiempo
textasies
theatricality
thigein & conatus
X

Comments (0)

Permalink

Undivided

join

in loving

transformation

here

answer terror

and hate

with

lust

for life

for a humanity

undivided

by fear

Lingis –

“lust surges through a body

in transubstantiation”

loving transformation is

transubstantiation

when “in the midst of social transactions,

there is contact with the substance of the other,

and lust

breaks through”

(Alphonso Lingis)

...
advertisement
Ἀκαδήμεια
hommangerie
infemmarie
τραῦμα
porte-parole
thigein & conatus

Comments (0)

Permalink

another quotation towards Minus Theatre’s workshop at Performance of Hope Symposium, on decomposition, illustrated with some photos by Sebastião Salgado and a clip of Rita Renoir

“The material things do not lie bare and naked before us; they are there by engendering perspectival deformations, halos, mirages, scattering their colors in the light and their images on surrounding things. Human bodies too move in the world engendering profiles and telescoping images of themselves, casting shadows, sending off murmurings, echoes, rustlings, leaving traces and stains. Their freedom is a material freedom by which they decompose whatever nature they were given and whatever form culture put on them, leaving in the streets and the fields the lines of their fingers or feet dance, leaving their warmth in the hands of others and in the winds, their fluids on tools and chairs, their visions in the night. Bodies do not occupy their spot in space and time, filling it to capacity, such that their beauty would be statuesque. We do not see bodies whose form and colors are held by concepts we recognize or reconstitute. We do not see bodies in their own integrity or inner coherence. We are struck by the cool eyes of the prince of inner-city streets, moved by the hand of the old woman covering the sleep of a child. We are fascinated by the hands of the Balinese priest drawing invisible arabesques over flowers and red pigment and water. Our morning is brightened by a slum-dweller whistling while hauling out garbage. We hear the laughter of the Guatemalan campesinos gathered about a juggler, like water cascading in the murmur of the forest. When we are beguiled by the style with which the body leaves its tones, glances, shadows, halos, mirages in the world, we see the human body’s own beauty. In the decomposition in our memory, in so many bodies greeted only with passionate kisses of parting, we have divined being disseminated a knowing how to live trajectories of time as moments of grace.

“When the scale of a human presence scattered across vast spaces seems unconceptualizable, as also the utter simplicity of certain gestures and movements seems undiagrammable, we have before a human body a sense of the sublime. The sublimity of a body departing into the unmeasurable spaces make the ideas we form of the superhuman and the divine seem like second-rate fictions. The sentiment of the sublime is a disarray in the vision, a turmoil in the touch that seeks to hold it, a vortex in our sensibility that makes us ecstatically crave to sacrifice all that we have and are to it.

“Human warmth in the winds, tears and sweat left in our hands, carnal colors that glow briefly before the day fades, dreams in the night, patterns decomposing in memory, sending our way momentary illuminations: bodies of others that touch us by dismembering. The unconceptualizable forces that break up the pleasing forms of human beauty and break into the pain and exultation of the sublime are also delirium and decomposition. Not sublimity in the midst of abjection: sublime disintegration, sickness, madness. The exultation before the sublime is also contamination. Porous bodies exhaling microbes, spasmodically spreading deliriums, viruses, pollutions, toxins.”

– in Abuses (1994), Alphonso Lingis, pp. 137-139

...
Ἀκαδήμεια
hommangerie
imarginaleiro
inanimadvertisement
infemmarie
τραῦμα
luz es tiempo
pique-assiettes
porte-parole
thigein & conatus

Comments (0)

Permalink

a quotation for the Minus Workshop at the Performance of Hope Symposium 9-11 Nov. 2015

a group listen to Pavel Haas’s Study for Strings. A Czech composer, Haas wrote the piece in Theresienstadt, shortly before being transferred to Auschwitz, where he died.

“We listened to the piece standing, with the same grave expressions as everyone else gathered there, watching other spectators … In the end, a group of around thirty people formed, who had followed the concert of violins and cellos with emotion, remaining motionless and sunk in thought, moved, profoundly silent, as if recovering from the collapse provoked by what they had heard, and also by what they remembered, what had been evoked, almost reenacted, I’d go as far as to say experienced, because it wasn’t difficult to feel vulnerable and tragic there, like a deportee.”

… “it seemed incredible to me I hadn’t been aware from the outset that the political, or more accurately the eternal illusion of a humanized world was inseparable from artistic endeavours, from the most forward-thinking art.” …

“I would have like to say […]: How could I have been so stupid? Or perhaps the opposite … Whatever the case, I opted to keep quiet and devote myself to carefully observing the general mental recovery of the people gathered there. I ended up identifying an intense communion between all these strangers, who, having surely come from such different places, had congregated there. It was as if they were all thinking, we were all thinking: we’ve been the moment, and this is the place, and now we know what our problem is. It was as if a spirit, a breeze, a current of morally bracing air, an invisible impetus, were pushing us toward the future, forging forever the union between the diverse members of that spontaneous, suddenly subversive-seeming group.

“This is the kind of thing, I thought, that we can never see on television news programs. There are silent conspiracies between people who seem to understand one another without talking, quiet rebellions that take place in the world every minute without being noticed; groups form by chance, unplanned reunions in the middle of the park or on a dark corner, occasionally allowing us to be optimistic about the future of humanity. They join together for a few minutes and then go their separate ways, all enlisting in the hidden fight against moral misery. One day, they will rise up with unheard-of fury and blow everything to bits.”

– from The Illogic of Kassel (2015), Enrique Vila-Matas, pp. 60-1

...
Ἀκαδήμεια
immedia
pique-assiettes
thigein & conatus

Comments (0)

Permalink

Minus looking at painters, 1

Minus Theatre workshop 5/8/2015 used Odd Nerdrum’s paintings as material for theatre to copy and learn from, imitate and express.

What we are looking for is what this young girl is holding in a painting by Guillermo Lorca García-Huidobro:

It is a handful of expressive brushstrokes or gestures. Or a handful of paint. Or even tones of paint.

Nerdrum called himself a kitsch painter for being  committed “to the eternal: love, death and the sunrise.” Returning from the repression of modernism sentimentality, passion, pathos and art in its most primitive sense as the virtues of craft.

Jenny Saville’s work is also interesting for the exundancy of the flesh which recalls the powers of distortion Francis Bacon said he gleaned from Pablo Picasso. (Gleaning, as in the film by Agnès Varda, is also an inspiration for Minus.) But here again, it is probably a question of the expressive force of painting causing the flesh to overflow, in which the flesh participates as overflowing. The tension might in Saville’s painting be the stylistic stretch between Egon Schiele and Bacon (which is also between drawing and painting). Here rather in a photographic collaboration with Glenn Luchford than in her painting:

And in its painterly/graphic aspect, where the paint or tone explodes from the head (a theme literalised elsewhere in her oeuvre). And this explosion resembles what Minus is gleaning, or stealing, from the girl above–a handful of capacity or potential:

...
Ἀκαδήμεια
hommangerie
infemmarie
luz es tiempo
porte-parole
thigein & conatus

Comments (0)

Permalink

auditions / hearings, not readings / being given audience

2015 audition flier@700

...
advertisement
Ἀκαδήμεια
theatricality
theatrum philosophicum
thigein & conatus

Comments (0)

Permalink

Minus Theatre’s BONESEED performances 12-15 February at Auckland University of Technology, email info@minustheatre.com for more information

...
advertisement
Ἀκαδήμεια
imarginaleiro
immedia
inanimadvertisement
tagged
theatricality
thigein & conatus

Comments (0)

Permalink

you are invited to attend the opening performance of Minus Theatre’s BONESEED at 6pm February 12, Sir Paul Reeves Bldg., AUT city campus, WG210

– still by Dominic Taylor                              

...
advertisement
Ἀκαδήμεια
hommangerie
imarginaleiro
immedia
inanimadvertisement
infemmarie
luz es tiempo
theatricality
thigein & conatus

Comments (0)

Permalink

MINUS THEATRE DAY OF FILMING 11 January 2015 (at Lot23, stills by Lernie Ang)

DSCF2282_c.jpg DSCF2292_c.jpg DSCF2316_e.jpg DSCF2314_c.jpg DSCF2304_c.jpg DSCF2303_c.jpg DSCF2301_c.jpg DSCF2323_e.jpg DSCF2334_c.jpg DSCF2336_c.jpg DSCF2339_c.jpg DSCF2390_e.jpg DSCF2384_e.jpg DSCF2376_e.jpg DSCF2359_c.jpg DSCF2345_c.jpg DSCF2394_e.jpg DSCF2402_e.jpg DSCF2406_c.jpg DSCF2410_e.jpg DSCF2420_c.jpgDSCF2428_e DSCF2439_c DSCF2443_e DSCF2448_c DSCF2454_e DSCF2455_c DSCF2457_c DSCF2458_c DSCF2463_c DSCF2467_e DSCF2475_e DSCF2481_c DSCF2486_c DSCF2492_c DSCF2497_c DSCF2498_c DSCF2522_c DSCF2527_c DSCF2554_c DSCF2572_c

...
advertisement
Ἀκαδήμεια
luz es tiempo
theatricality
theatrum philosophicum
thigein & conatus
X

Comments (0)

Permalink

Re: grouping – Minus Theatre’s change of phase, AGM & 3rd Project

following an earlier post, here, for a hopeful workshop, which was cancelled, Minus Theatre’s weekly workshops were cancelled, not just this hopeful one, until the group of past and future members came together, Tuesday 18 November to talk about our 3rd Project – for the Auckland Fringe Festival, February 11 – 1 March 2015. You were invited to attend, email info@minustheatre.com … and some of you did. Thank you.

This means a change in the way we work. There now appears to be a goal, the performances coinciding with the Fringe, and a requirement for regular practice/workshop/rehearsal sessions leading up to it. But it is this not so much. What we present for the Fringe will be a work in progress and not the end result of adequate planning. The planning we need to engage in at this point does entail a change in methodology but from the point of view of epistemology.

Weekly workshops have been central to the methodology of Minus Theatre Research Group until now. The method we have developed since March this year, called ‘theatre of the individual life’, allows for a minimum workshop attendance of one. One person – it could be me! It could be me closely observing and analysing my own physical and verbal expressions, to be able to dis-organise these ‘symptoms’ (in contrast to ‘signs’ which have meaning) in the place of my body, in the space of the studio, in the time of the audience – an audience of one, too, me!

In practice, this has never happened. Although the option was given, when we had only a few participants, of whether to go ahead or chat, eat cake and drink coffee and tea, the smallest groups for the workshops were a minimum of three, including me. And sometimes even a larger group chose cake over theatre, which is hardly surprising, given the beautiful home baking. (The coffee’s not bad, either: an incentive for potential Minus Theatre members!)

After Textured Passages, September 8, 12, it was more usual for the several people who came to workshops, still then being held on a weekly basis, to want to sit and chat – the exception became the rule. I asked myself why, given a method which determinedly does not make a precondition of the whole group turning up – a source of frustration when running rehearsals with a set cast in the past – why should we not conduct the workshop with the one person, the two people who do turn up?

Two possible answers occurred to me: a lackadaisical attitude brought about by familiarity and regularity – if the workshops are going to be held anyway, does the individual feel needed enough to come along? In addition, Textured Passages was a massive undertaking with relatively little preparation. We incorporated musical resources, used costumes – albeit schematic and generic; we took on a difficult space, a gallery, where audiences were unsure what was expected of them; and so we had the pressure of somewhat diffident, sometimes uncomprehending, although almost universally appreciative audiences. A second answer, beyond the known-quantity-ness of the practice and the hangover of the shows, slowly crept up on me: something to do with the group dynamic itself is affecting individual behaviour. Whenever just a few people came to workshops their first question was always, who else is coming? Where’s so-and-so? Where’s she? Where in fact is the group when the individual is here?

I was reluctant to admit it but despite the method needing only one individual to engage the practice the individuals need the group. Why? There is a possibility that this is a matter of group identity or group dynamic, but these are ongoing processes: the group is not a closed product; it is always in the process of formation, and re-formation, as members leave, return, and new people join. What is it about this process, then, that made each member want all present to move forward with the practice?

I now think it has to do primarily with an epistemological shift, which might be summarised in the notion of the embodied knowledge of the group in Minus Theatre. I had, previous to October, not thought that if a kind of thought is going on in the practice and I had not known that if a kind of knowledge (ethological) is being produced in the technique where that thought and knowledge would go to, to be called on, or recalled, in its advance, in its recollection, in practice. It seems to be clear now that where it was at, over this intervening time, and where it is, is in the bodies of the people in the group. The resistance to going ahead on a weekly basis comes from the situation where the whole group is not present at the workshops contributing their thought-knowledge which each individual embodies.

Weekly workshops through October therefore took two steps back for every step forward. This is why in getting together, assembling, on Tuesday night, 18 November, to be assembled as a formation, forming a group, a minimal cell or corps, we were re-membering – becoming avant-garde – re-membered. Disorganisation may come hereafter.

As events go, in the event, Minus Theatre’s first AGM was a raging, encouraging success. However I got to say none of the things I have outlined above. And what is worse, I did not get to congratulate every person in this group for having got it this far to do what it has done. White Flower established that we have indeed developed a theatrical form all our own, as one audience member put it, which works. Textured Passages was like a human particle accelerator, that, several audience members claimed, gave off a spiralling energy drawing them in, energising them and cleaning their brains.

The following contains repeats but it is something like what I had hoped to say: Welcome! Thank you for coming! I called this meeting because Minus Theatre is changing phase. The change of phase comes because the knowledge we have acquired along the way and the thinking going on – and a lot does go on all the time in our work – is in the group. It is not written down. It is not in my PhD research. So that to bring it to new work, to progress and go further means we need to be a group, meeting regularly, committed to extending both ourselves in our technique and understanding and the group.

Earlier Minus Theatre was about teaching and training. I think it has taken on a life of its own. This still means new people are more than welcome and that we will be doing workshops involving learning and teaching. But the group overall will have more responsibility. In other words, it is not just me who has the knowledge and knows the technique – the unique theatrical language of Minus Theatre that includes all the languages spoken and the technique that includes all the different skills each person brings – it is the group.

Part of what we do will continue to find out what special skills, what powers, each individual, each person has that makes our work together more interesting and exciting and intense.

The next project is called Boneseed

We decided to meet on Tuesday evenings, from 6pm to 9pm at AUT. Again, if you are interested in joining, adding your powers, learning more or supporting us, please contact me here.

Minus Theatre is here – and developing an independent website, the forerunner of which is here.

...
Ἀκαδήμεια
textatics
theatricality
thigein & conatus
X

Comments (0)

Permalink